Too and So + Adjective

 

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Many ESL students (and other speakers of English as a second language, not necessarily students) often get confused with So and Too. These two intensifiers are NOT interchangeable; they don’t mean the same.

So means very. That’s it.

Examples:

She is so smart. (She is very smart.)

Wow. This pumpkin is so big. It’s my first time to see a pumpkin this big. (This pumpkin is very big.)

Too, on the other hand, expresses a negative meaning. We use Too when we want to say that something or someone (the Subject of the sentence) does NOT meet a required standard.

 Examples:

This dress is too long for me. It doesn’t look good on me. I need a shorter one.

These shoes are too small. My feet hurt.

No, she should not get a job. She’s too young to get a job.

I don’t understand Math. It’s too difficult for me.

This soup is too salty! (The soup is saltier than necessary; the chef put too much salt.)

 Japanese Translation By: Google Translate

くのESL学生(および第二言語としての英語話者ずしも学生ではない)は、SoToo混同されることがよくあります。これらの2つのインテンシファイアは互換性がありません。意味ではありません。

つまり、非常意味します。それでおしまい。

She is so smart. 彼女はとてもい。)

Wow. This pumpkin is so big. It’s my first time to see a pumpkin this big. (このカボチャはとてもきいです。)

一方、あまりにも否定的意味表現します。かまたはか(主語)が必要基準たしていないことをいたい場合は、Too使用します。

 

This dress is too long for me. It doesn’t look good on me. I need a shorter one.

These shoes are too small. My feet hurt.

No, she should not get a job. She’s too young to get a job.

I don’t understand Math. It’s too difficult for me.

This soup is too salty! (スプは必要以上塩辛いです。シェフがれすぎています。)

 

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