Posts

FASHION

Raise or Rise?

Image
  No doubt, these two verbs often give confusion to students of English as a Second Language, or ESL. These two verbs are NOT interchangeable. Raise- This is a transitive verb, and it requires an object. To raise means to lift, to carry, to move something to a higher position; hence, somebody does the action. Examples: Raise your hand Raise your glass Raise your employees’ salaries Rise- this is an intransitive verb which means to move to a higher position; it’s an upward movement. This does not require an object, and nobody has to perform the action. The subject performs the action by itself. Examples: The moon rises in the northeast. The swan is rising gracefully from the lake. Thanks for reading this blog post! See you again next time!~

See you IN or See You AT?

Image
  See you IN or See You AT? Some students of English as a Second Language or ESL are sometimes confused with the correct usage of prepositions and of  course, that is understandable. This YouTube video discusses the difference between See you IN and See you At, using simple words and examples. IN means “inclusion of space” if we are using IN to refer to a place. The speaker is referring to a place in which there are walls, or barriers, or simply, a place where he/she is encapsulated in a place. AT, on the other hand, simply means “the exact location, the exact spot”. See you IN the restaurant or See you AT the restaurant? Find it out in the video. Thank you very much for watching the YouTube video and for reading this blog post! See you!~

Prepositions- Location

Image
This is another important grammar lesson that all students of English as a Second  Language (ESL) have to know by heart.   Prepositions That Indicate Location: at I saw Jack at the train station. by I love sitting by the window on rainy days. in The investors are having a meeting in the boardroom. on Please put the coffee cup on the countertop. near I will wait for you near the escalator.  

The Preposition--An Introduction

Image
Some students of ESL (English as a Second Language) get confused with prepositions. This is a short blog post about prepositions.  The words in English language (or any other language) do not just appear in any order. To convey/point across the meaning, the words have to be arranged in a specific order. Many words and phrases are joined in many ways, depending on what they want to convey. One way to link, connect, or bridge those words is by using Prepositions. What are Prepositions? In Google Dictionary, the word Preposition is defined as “ a word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause, as in “the man  on  the platform” There following words are one-syllable prepositions in English. They are used to show different relationships. Location: at, by, in,  near,  on, Direction:    down,  from,  off,   out,  past,  through,   to, up Association: for,  like,  of,    with In the next blog post, I a

Adverbs in Comparison

Image
This is another short but informative lesson for students of English as a Second Language, or ESL. Adverbs are also used in comparison, of course, because they are also modifiers. The Comparative and Superlative are formed as follows: 1.      If the adverb is only one syllable, just add -er. The sun shone brighter than it did yesterday. The exam took longer than usual.   2.      Most adverbs ending in -ly form the comparative with more. Take a look at the following examples: The second meeting of the cabinet members ended more fruitfully. The first time I made mushroom soup, I made a mistake. I made some again last night and I followed the instructions more accurately. It was yummy! The superlative form of the adverb is formed with -est or most . Adverbs that form the comparative with -er form the superlative with -est. And of course, if we use more for the comparative degree, automatically, we use most for the superlative degree.   COMPARATIVE          

Positions of Adverbs

Image
  In previous posts we discussed what a  directive adverb is. It is a verb that normally follows the verb it modifies.  And of course, aside from modifying a verb, an adverb can also modify an adjective or another adverb .  Take a look at the following examples. Directive Adverb:   The elevator went down . (Where did the elevator go?)  Adverb Modifying a Modifier:  Mango is a very common  fruit in the Philippines. (What kind of  fruit is  it?)  In the sentence above, ve ry is an adverb modifying the adjective common. Other Adverbs:   Suddenly , he turned and walked away.   He suddenly turned and walked away.  In the two sentences above, the word suddenly is an adverb modifying the verb turned.

Directive Adverbs and Idioms

Image
This is another lesson that is specifically intended for students of English as a Second Language, more popularly known as ESL.  Adverbs that tell where (place or direction) about the verb are called directive adverbs. They follow the word that they modify.  Examples: We looked for the missing dog near and far. The poor little bird fell down . The students are waiting outside. The professor angrily walked in. Interestingly, many of these directive adverbs are combined with verbs to make an idiom. An idiom, by the way, is a group of words that form a different meaning when combined together, but when we separate the words that make up an idiom, each word has a different meaning.  Examples of idioms (Directive Adverbs + Verbs) Give in Give off Give out Give up We know that give means to hand something , and out means not inside, up is the opposite of down , in means the opposite of out, and off is the opposite of on. But when we combine them with the verb